Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases

New Zealand is a member of the Global Research Alliance on agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

What is the Global Research Alliance?

The Mission of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases (GRA)is to bring countries together to find ways to grow more food without growing greenhouse gas emissions. It was launched in December 2009.

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How is New Zealand involved in the GRA?

New Zealand is a founding member, the current GRA Secretariat, is one of the Co-Chairs of the Livestock Research Group, and was GRA Council Chair (2011-2012).

The New Zealand Government committed $45 million to the work of the GRA in 2010 and in 2016 announced a further 20 million out to June 2020 to fund research in the area of greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in pasture based temporal livestock systems.

New Zealand is represented in the GRA by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), working closely with the environment and climate change groups from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) and the Ministry for the Environment (MfE). MPI contracts the NZAGRC to manage New Zealand’s involvement in the Livestock Research Group and New Zealand’s GRA science research activities.

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What is the GRA Livestock Research Group?

The Livestock Research Group (LRG) is focused on reducing the emissions intensity of livestock production systems and increasing the quantity of carbon stored in soils supporting those systems.

The LRG is co-chaired by NZAGRC Director, Dr Harry Clark and Dr Martin Scholten, Wageningen UR, Netherlands.

The LRG Vision is to:

  1. Increase agriculture production with lower emissions
  2. Improve global cooperation in research & technology
  3. Work with farmers and partners to provide knowledge

Read more or view the stories below for more information on the work of the LRG and GRA.

  • Searching deep within for methane battlers

    The role of microbes in producing methane is being studied by an Irish scientist, writes Jarrod Booker.

    While science is helping us discover vast new worlds beyond our own, the worlds explored by Sinead Leahy are far too small to be seen by the naked eye.

    This world of microbes – tiny bugs such as bacteria that could fit by the millions in the eye of a needle – are all around us and keep the planet functioning. For Leahy, a senior scientist at AgResearch, her focus over the last decade has been on the complex world of microbes in the stomachs of ruminants like cows and sheep – and the huge implications these tiny single-cell organisms have for both New Zealand's economy and environment.

    "We know so little about this microbial world, because people don't see it and they don't realise how important it is to us in New Zealand. It's only recently that we have started to get DNA sequencing technologies that allow us to study these worlds with new insight," Leahy says.

    "The microbes in the sheep or cow's rumen (a chamber of the stomach) powers the animal by allowing it to break down the grass it eats, and gives us the products like milk, meat and wool that New Zealand sells to the world."

    It is not only the size of the microbes in the rumen that makes them difficult to identify and study, it's also the environment they exist in – without oxygen – and the highly complex roles they play, and how they interact with each other.

    Irish-born and raised Leahy, alongside her colleagues in rumen microbiology at AgResearch, has spent the last decade in New Zealand learning more about these microbes, to help farmers produce healthier, more productive animals and lift New Zealand's economy. But the potential is also huge when it comes to methane gas produced by the animals, given that methane is the largest contributor to New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions.

    As scientists at AgResearch and elsewhere press to find ways to reduce the amount of methane produced – including potential for a methane vaccine – Leahy says the role of microbes here is crucial. By learning more about the microbes that are part of the process of producing the methane in the animals, there is the opportunity to find new ways to address it.

    Leahy was part of an international project led out of AgResearch, called Hungate1000, in which the genomes of hundreds of different microbes from ruminants from around the world were mapped to provide an important resource for researchers globally.

    While New Zealand should be proud of its rugby players and rowers, they should also recognise that in areas like rumen microbiology, New Zealand is a world leader, she says.

    Though she and her Irish-born husband are now also New Zealand citizens, along with their two New Zealand-born children, there is no question where her loyalties lie when it comes to the rugby arena. She looks back on the famous Irish victory over the All Blacks in Chicago last year as "one of the greatest days of my life".

    "It was a long time coming. After all the pain of the last 10 years, I finally got to come to work in my Ireland jersey and lord it over everyone for a change."

    Leahy, 38, was one of nine children growing up in the Irish township of Bilboa – she had more siblings than there were pupils in her primary school class. Her grandfather's small farm nearby had her exposed early to rural life – "we grew up with milk straight from the cow".

    Her family was very strong in mathematics, and she remembers telling them at a young age she was going to be a researcher.

    "I remember in primary school a teacher turning water with different colours with dye. It basically set me on the path from there."

    After completing her PhD in Cork, Leahy arrived in New Zealand in 2006, for what she told family and friends was part of a two year adventure around the world. After landing the job at AgResearch, and becoming attached to the work, her team, and the lifestyle, she decided to stay.

    "I think my family always knew I was going to go off and see the world and do something more."

    While retaining her position at AgResearch, Leahy has recently taken up a new role of International Capability and Training Co-ordinator for the Government-funded New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre (NZAGRC).

    The role will support the goals of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases, an initiative supported by the New Zealand Government to increase collaboration between countries to reduce the emissions intensity of food production. One of the objectives of Leahy's role is to engage scientists and policy audiences in the developing world on why lowering agricultural greenhouse gas emissions intensity (the emissions per kilogram of meat, milk, vegetables or grains) is important for their agricultural production.

    "It's something I haven't done before, working on that interface between governments and the science, and the area of developing policy," Leahy says.

    "It's vital to have that policy in place if you want to make real change, and for that policy to be built on quality science."

    Source: http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/discovery/92855914/searching-deep-within-for-methane-battlers

    • Sinead Leahy is the International Capability and Training Co-ordinator at the NZAGRAC. Read her profile

  • CCAFS 2016 Annual Report

    CCAFS 2016 Annual Report is now available noting significant progress on agriculture under climate change was made in 2016.

    Read the report

    NZAGRC & CCAFS

    The NZAGRC through the GRA LRG work programme is pleased to to work with CCAFS on improving countries’ ability to monitor, report and verify GHG emissions from livestock. Read more

  • CCAFS MRV summary report

    The NZAGRC through the GRA LRG work programme is pleased to to work with CCAFS on improving countries’ ability to monitor, report and verify GHG emissions from livestock.  A summary of the MRV report is available.

    Read the report

  • Low emissions development of the beef cattle sector in Uruguay

    The NZAGRC in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN has released a report evaluating the potential for improving productivity while reducing enteric methane emission intensity from beef production in Uruguay.

    Acknowledgements
    This project is a collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (www.fao.org) and the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre, funded by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the FAO and the New Zealand Government in support of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases. 

    View report (external website)

    Read more about the project (external website)

  • Supporting low emissions development in the Bangladesh dairy sector

    The NZAGRC in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN has released a report evaluating the potential for improving milk production while reducing enteric methane emission intensity from dairy production in Bangladesh.

    Acknowledgements
    This project is a collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (www.fao.org) and the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre, funded by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the FAO and the New Zealand Government in support of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases. 

    View the report (external website)

    Read more about the project (external website)

  • Supporting low emissions development in the Ethiopian dairy cattle sector

    The NZAGRC in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN has released a report evaluating the potential for improving milk production while reducing enteric methane emission intensity from dairy cattle production in Ethiopia.

    Acknowledgements
    This project is a collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (www.fao.org) and the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre, funded by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the FAO and the New Zealand Government in support of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases. 

    View the report (external website)

    Read more about this project (external website)

  • Sharing New Zealand's success story

    The Livestock Research Group of the Global Research Alliance is documenting countries’ successes in reducing on-farm emissions intensity of livestock production at the same time as addressing other concerns related to increasing productivity, increasing resource use efficiency, or reducing other externalities of their livestock systems.

    New Zealand submitted a case study about reducing the emissions intensity of livestock production on New Zealand farms.

    View the New Zealand case study (external website)

    Other countries success stories http://globalresearchalliance.org/research/livestock/ 

  • Global links strengthen agriculture research

    A new round of research funding and the appointment of a Special Representative are big steps forward for New Zealand’s involvement in the Global Research Alliance, Ministers Paula Bennett and Nathan Guy say.

    “New Zealander Hayden Montgomery has been endorsed by GRA member countries as its first Special Representative. The appointment highlights the confidence other countries have in New Zealand and the value they place in the work we do managing the GRA Secretariat,” Climate Change Issues Minister Paula Bennett says.

    “This appointment will allow the GRA to better work with international and regional organisations, NGOs and the agricultural sector globally to reduce agricultural greenhouse gases and to improve the productivity of farmers globally.

    “Since 1990, New Zealand farmers’ productivity gains have prevented agricultural emissions from rising an additional 40 per cent. The GRA is doing critical work sharing best practice abroad and working on the next big advances the world needs.”

    The fourth round of the Global Partnerships in Livestock Emissions Research (GPLER) has also now opened which is providing $9.2million in contestable research funding.

    “This funding comes from the $20 million contribution to the GRA announced by Prime Minister John Key at the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December last year. It will be available for four research challenges covering rumen function, nitrous oxide emissions, soil carbon change and improvement in emissions intensity at farm-level,” Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy says.

    “The GPLER has been an important tool for identifying and funding cutting edge research focused on reducing agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and accelerating global research efforts.  

    “The international, collaborative nature of the fund has previously seen New Zealand scientists working with counterparts in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Norway and USA.”

    Details on the fund and applications for the fourth round of funding can be found at https://www.mpi.govt.nz/funding-and-programmes/farming/global-partnerships-in-livestock-emissions-research/

  • PhD Opportunity: Stabilized carbon in Grasslands Management

    Visit globalresearchalliance.org /n/phd-opportunity-stabilized-carbon-in-grasslands-management/ for more information

  • Improved productivity reduces GHGs and improves food security and livelihoods

    Article at http://www.wfo-oma.com/farmletters.html

    Acknowledgements
    This project is a collaboration between the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (www.fao.org) and the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre, funded by the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the FAO and the New Zealand Government in support of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases. 

    Download full Farmletter March 2016

    Download pages 14-16

  • FACCE ERA-NET ERA-GAS call

    ERA-NET for Monitoring and Mitigation of Greenhouse gases from Agri- and Silvi-culture (ERA-GAS) call for proposals is open. ERA-GAS aims to strengthen the transnational coordination of research activities and provide added value to research and innovation on GHG mitigation. The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is 3 May 2016, 14:00 CET.

    You can find more information at http://www.faccejpi.com/FACCE-Joint-activities/ERA-GAS/ERA-GAS-Call-is-openNew

    New Zealand is a partner in the call and funding is available for New Zealand researchers to participate. Information about New Zealand participation in the call can be found at http://archive.mpi.govt.nz/environment-natural-resources/climate-change/research-and-funded-projects/nz-participation-in-the-european-era-gas-research

    Questions?
    New Zealand researchers who are interested in participating in proposals are encouraged to contact the NZAGRC to discuss the process and ask questions.

  • Outcomes from the meetings of the Livestock Research Group and Integrative Research Group

    Over fifty people attended the recent meeting of the Livestock Research Group in Melbourne, Australia recently. This was the eighth meeting for the group, held 19-20 February 2016 immediately following the international Greenhouse Gas & Animal Agriculture (GGAA) conference. It also encompassed a joint meeting with the GRA's newly formed Integrative Research Group (IRG).

    Representation spanned the globe, including two new observers from Tanzania and Uganda, and several key LRG partners - CCAFS, FAO and the World Bank. The meeting traversed the full range of the LRG's work plan. 

    Main outcomes

    Current research landscape
    Countries were interested in learning more about each other's domestic research in support of the GRA's ambitions, and also about existing capability building projects, programmes and funding mechanisms, including where GHG emissions may not be the primary focus but where this could be added as a component (e.g. livestock productivity and development). A good reference point for this information is the country-specific web pages available in the community section of the GRA website - countries were encouraged to update their pages via the Secretariat.

    Building capability
    Continuing with capability building, the meeting agreed a central theme for the LRG's efforts in this area during 2016 and beyond: Helping countries move towards Tier 2 GHG inventories and designing improved measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) systems for livestock GHGs.

    As the year unfolds, the LRG will look to its partnerships with other key organisations working in this area to prioritise and develop a programme of activity in this growing area of interest. Opportunities exist with CCAFS and the World Bank to strengthen tools, training and processes for countries to measure, report and verify their livestock GHG emissions and to improve how national GHG inventories capture information on gains in livestock productivity. The LRG will also work with CCAFS to compile existing capability building materials on livestock GHG research into an open access information platform.

    The LRG's flagship capability building project (partnering with FAO and drawing on funding from the Climate & Clean Air Coalition and the New Zealand Government), ‘Reducing enteric methane for improving food security and livelihoods' was discussed as stage 1 of this initiative is scheduled to come to an end during 2016. Stage 1 has focused on identifying and prioritising high potential areas for mitigation in ruminant livestock production systems in various regions, aiming to design cost-effective technical ‘intervention packages' that can deliver multiple benefits on farms. The meeting agreed the importance of pursuing a second stage for the project, which would see the intervention packages tested on farms and scaled up for widespread implementation.

    Collaborative research / Research networks and databases
    A core focus of the LRG's meeting agenda was the work of the research networks with a dynamic breakout group session to discuss their recent achievements and hear their ideas for priority collaborative research during 2016 and beyond, along with identifying possible funding mechanisms to support this future work (including ERA-GAS call). 

    In addition, the meeting received an update on the development of a regional network for Mediterranean countries, led by Italy. This will focus initially on a multidisciplinary approach to water resources and quality, mycotoxins in feed, heat stress tolerances and vector borne diseases. Countries interested in being involved should contact Giacomo Pirlo (giacomo.pirlo@entecra.it).

    Good practice guidance and methodologies
    The LRG's Manure Management Network indicated that it would like to review the existing N2O Chamber Methodology Guidelines and update and expand them as necessary.

    Policy support and links to international initiatives
    Interest was expressed in translating the very popular joint LRG and SAI-Platform industry publication, ‘Reducing GHG emissions from livestock: best practice and emerging options', into other languages. We are hoping that this may soon be available in French, Spanish and possibly Thai. The LRG will also work with the SAI-Platform to hold joint seminars in various regions that extend on that publication, showcasing industry/science partnerships that are already reducing the emissions intensity of livestock production.

    An opportunity was identified for the LRG to assist the World Bank in developing a programme to guide investors to large-scale implementation of sustainable livestock, including addressing emissions intensity. Opportunities for increased engagement with the FAO were also identified, including via the Global Agenda on Sustainable Livestock (GASL) and the Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance Partnership. The meeting also received a demonstration of the new FAO tool to support countries tackling climate change through livestock production, GLEAM-i, which enables governments, industry, producers and others to calculate emissions and emissions reductions from various interventions using Tier 2 inventory methods.

    The next meeting of the LRG will be held in Washington DC, USA in April 2017. More details will be sent towards the end of this year.

    Joint discussions with the Integrative Research Group
    A core part of this year's LRG meeting was a joint meeting with the GRA's newly formed IRG. This group was agreed at the 2015 GRA Council meeting as a merger of the previous two cross-cutting groups on soil C and N cycling, and inventories and monitoring issues. The joint meeting was co-chaired by Australia, Canada and France as the Co-chairs of the IRG.

    The IRG Co-chairs outlined the scope of the new group as being focused on the estimation, monitoring and projection of GHG emissions within and across agricultural systems. Its activities will centre around a series of networks on different integrative issues across the GRA:

    • Grasslands network: transfers and builds on the existing LRG network
    • Soil carbon sequestration network: new, but builds on work started across the GRA
    • Field scale modelling network: builds on existing work from the former Soil C & N Cross-Cutting Group
    • Farm scale and regional modelling network: new, but builds on work started across the GRA
    • GHG inventories network: builds on existing work from the former Inventories & Monitoring Cross-Cutting Group

    The joint meeting identified possible short and longer-term activities for these network, including a potential connection with the French 4‰ Initiative on soil carbon for food security and climate change. The IRG Co-chairs underscored the importance of identifying key audiences and end users for the group's work and of packaging their outputs appropriately. This point was picked up throughout the wider LRG meeting as well.

     

  • Nitrous oxide emissions from grazing cattle urine patches: Bridging the gap between measurement and stakeholder requirements

    F.J. Cook, F.M. Kelliher, Nitrous oxide emissions from grazing cattle urine patches: Bridging the gap between measurement and stakeholder requirements, Environmental Modelling & Software, Volume 75, January 2016, Pages 133-152, ISSN 1364-8152, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envsoft.2015.10.009.
    (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364815215300670)

    Abstract:
    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and a precursor to compounds which deplete stratospheric ozone. Agricultural soils are the principal anthropogenic N2O source, which includes urine patches of cattle fed by grazing pasture. While such N2O emissions can be measured, involved time and space scales are usually only minutes and metres, respectively. Nevertheless, climate change stakeholders need large-scale national emissions over time to construct annual N2O emissions inventories for international treaty compliance requirements. We have developed a mathematical model to bridge the gap between measurement and stakeholder requirements for N2O emissions from grazing cattle urine patches.

    Our methodology begins with the emissions from a patch. Convolution integrals are then used to spatially and temporally scale the emissions from discrete grazing events to paddock, farm and region levels across the year. The model developed shows how the emissions are smoothed out with scaling and the implications from the scaling.

    Keywords: Nitrous oxide; Scaling; Urine patches; Inventories; Greenhouse gases

  • COP21 Agricultural Events

    Overview of thematic events including agriculture and forestry:

    http://newsroom.unfccc.int/media/501938/lpaa_program.pdf

    Tuesday 1 December

     The LPAA "Focus on Agriculture" (learn more) at COP21 aims to show that the transition to a climate-resilient and low-GHG agriculture is feasible and already underway by showcasing existing solutions. Parties, organisations, and businesses will announce concrete, ambitious, multi-stakeholder initiatives to be included in the LPAA Learn more

    One of the highlights will be the launch of "4/1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate" Learn more 

    JRC and CEPI/ICFPA Event:"Assessing transparency and ambition in the land use sector" Learn more

    Wednesday 2 December

    Farmers Day Learn more

    "Colombia's climate strategies: mitigation, adaptation, Amazon Vision and linkages with agriculture" Learn more

    Friday 4 December

    Short-Lived Climate Pollutants (SLCP) Focus Day Learn more

    Saturday 5 December and Sunday 6 December

    Global Landscapes Forum Learn more

    This includes:

    "Shaping sustainable supply chains of the future: How to create links between smallholder farmers, companies sourcing raw materials, and the environment" Learn more

    "Side event: From farmers' fields to landscapes: Food security in a new climate regime?" Learn more

    Monday 7 December
    "Metrics of progress towards net zero and the two degree goal: science for a safe climate" Learn more

    Tuesday 8 December
    CCAC High Level Assembly Learn more

    Wednesday 9 December
    "Agriculture in a Post-Kyoto Terrain" Learn more

    Thursday 10 December
    "Carbon sequestration and agriculture" Learn more

  • Global solutions to reduce methane emissions from ruminant animals are feasible, because the microbes causing the emissions are similar around the world

    The New Zealand-led “Global Rumen Census” project analysed the microbes responsible for ethane emissions from a wide range of ruminant animals around the world. The project found imilar bacteria and methanogens dominate in nearly all rumens across a wide variety of species and animal diets. This means that new technologies that seek to reduce methane emissions by influencing rumen microbes should have global applications.

    The results of the Global Rumen Census were released on 9 October 2015 in the open-access journal Scientific Reports.

    Global press release

    pdf GRC Global Release (0.31MB) 

    New Zealand press release

    pdf GRC New Zealand Release (0.34MB) 

    Science Q&A

    pdf GRC Q&A (0.29MB) 

    Rumen microbial community composition varies with diet and host, but a core microbiome is found across a wide geographical range
    G. Henderson, F. Cox, S. Ganesh, A. Jonker, W. Young, P.H. Janssen. 2015.
    Scientific Reports 5: 14567.
    www.nature.com/articles/srep14567

  • Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from livestock: Best practice and emerging options

    The publication is a joint initiative of the Livestock Research Group (LRG) of the Global Research Alliance and the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative (SAI) Platform. It was commissioned by the New Zealand Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre.

    NZAGRC special edition news

    Download guidelines at www.globalresearchalliance.org

    Media Statement from SAI Platrform at www.saiplatform.org

  • New Zealand contribution to international research efforts

    New Zealand maintains an active role in the Global Research Alliance on agricultural greenhouse gases (GRA). NZAGRC provides leadership in livestock emissions research and training in emissions measurement throughout the world.

    Training & development opportunities
    During September the GRA provided a two week training course to 15 African region technicians to learn about enteric methane and nitrous oxide measurement systems. The NZAGRC worked with the University of Pretoria to organise the course, in South Africa, which provided a full training course for nitrous oxide chamber measurement methods, building and using SF¬6 tracer technique yokes, using respiration chambers for methane measurement and understanding and analysing the data collected from these methods.

    An additional information day for these technicians was held in collaboration with AnimalCHANGE covering an overview of measurement systems and the current international research environment, information on national inventory contributions.
    The course was the second run by the NZAGRC through the New Zealand Government's capability development fund; the first was in New Zealand in 2013 for South East Asia and South American technicians.

    For individuals looking for new opportunities to train, PhD, Postdoctoral and Technician's Awards are always open to international applications to develop skills working in a New Zealand organisation - the first step is for the candidate to complete an expression of interest form from www.livestockemissions.net

    For Senior Scientists, a GRASS Award provides funding for a short term (up to six months) research collaboration with other GRA member countries. For more information, visit www.livestockemissions.net

    New Zealand led research successes
    The New Zealand funded ‘Identification of low methane emitting phenotypes' project, a targeted postdoctoral research project funded in 2011/2012 was completed earlier in the year. The project has shown that genomic selection for methane yield is viable, although not yet tested in industry, and developed documentation to enable research and industry groups around the world to record this trait in standard industry compatible databases. For information on this project see www.asggn.org.nz

    The Global Rumen Census will be completed in the next few weeks by AgResearch in support of the Livestock Research Group of the GRA. The project collected and analysed rumen samples from more than 50 livestock systems around the world. The project outputs will provide a very interesting overview of the microbial communities present in the rumen of animals in a variety of species and regions, and provide information on the regional or global applicability of specific mitigation options being developed, such as a vaccine against methane-generating microbes. The background to this project can be found at www.globalrumencensus.org.nz

    Other projects still on the road include:

    • Development of optimal adjuvants for a methane vaccine
    • Search for methanogen inhibitors & rapid discovery techniques
    • Global catalogue of genome sequences of methane-generating microbes
    • Investigations into a variety of new methane emission reduction options(Nanobeads, interspecies hydrogen transfer, natural lovastatins)
    • Investigations into options for nitrous oxide emission reduction (accelerating
    • reduction, provision of decision making tools)
    • Options for use and validation of methane measurement systems in New Zealand.

    Other international research collaborations (with New Zealand funding provision) include contributing to research in:

    • Australia
    • Europe
    • USA
    • South East Asia

  • New Zealand Fund for Global Partnerhips in Livestock Emissions Research: Targetted meetings presentation

    Recent meetings in Palmerston North, Hamilton and Christchurch to discuss Round two of the New Zealand Fund for Global Partnerships in Livestock Emissions Research were held successfully.  A copy of the presentation is available for download

    pdf GPF Presentation June 2012 (1.28MB) 

  • Technical Manual on Respiration Chamber Designs

    Technical Manual on Respiration Chamber Designs
    Released: March 2012
    Edited by: Cesar Pinares & Garry Waghorn

    Download here 

     

  • Animal Selection, Genetics and Genomics Whitepaper

    Following the May 2011 Workshop in Auckland, New Zealand; a White Paper was prepared for the New Zealand Government, whcih discussed how a network of scientists working in the area of Animal Selection, Genetics and Genomics, might progress the management of enteric methane emissions from grazing livestock.

    This ‘white paper’ identified an opportunity for NZ to contribute significantly to reducing methane (CH4) emissions and emissions intensity (per unit product) in both cattle and sheep by capitalising on animal to animal genetic variation.

    A workshop, commissioned by the New Zealand Government to support the goals and objectives of the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases (GRA), was held in Auckland in May 2011.  Key international researchers met and discussed “a network on animal breeding approaches to reduce methane emissions”.

    Read more

     

     

  • Animal Selection, Genetics and Genomics Workshop Report

    pdf Download the report (1.69MB)

  • N2O Chamber Methodology Guideline Workshop Report

    pdf Download this report (0.57MB)

  • RMG Network Whitepaper

    pdf Download this report (0.27MB)

  • Rumen Taxonomy Framework Report

    pdf Download this report (0.44MB)

  • SF6 Tracer Techniques Guidelines Workshop Report

    pdf Download this report (0.55MB)

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