Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change

What is the IPCC?

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the leading international body for the assessment of climate change.

The IPCC is an intergovernmental body and focuses on the science-policy interface, i.e. handing over scientific information so that it can underpin government decisions on how to address climate change.

It is open to all member countries of the United Nations (UN) and WMO.

Reports are written by scientists drawn from around the world based on their expertise and geographical balance. 

Governments participate in the review process and the plenary Sessions, where main decisions about the IPCC work programme are taken and reports are accepted, adopted and approved.

The IPCC provides guidelines and best practice advice on preparing greenhouse gas emissions inventories through its Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

IPCC Structure Read more

IPCC Reports Read more

What is the IPCC  Bureau?

The IPCC Bureau consists of the IPCC Chair, three IPCC Vice Chairs, Co-Chairs of the three Working Groups and the Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories and 6-8 members of each of the three Working Group Bureaus. The Bureau is chaired by the IPCC Chair (recently elected Dr Hoesung Lee from the Republic of Korea). The Bureau’s work is supported by the IPCC Secretariat based in Geneva.

IPCC Bureau Composition Read more

The Impact of Livestock Agriculture on Climate Change

There is robust scientific evidence that the climate is changing, and that most of the warming observed over the past 50 years is due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations from human activities. This fact sheet summarises why, and how, livestock agriculture contributes to climate change, and why limiting the projected global increase in those emissions is seen as a key component of dealing with climate change.

With almost half of our emissions from agriculture, New Zealand is unique in the developed world. Understanding the global contribution of agriculture to climate change provides important context for New Zealand's efforts to enable agriculture to continue to create wealth in a carbon constrained world.

pdf Download fact sheet 1 (high res) (5.80MB) 

pdf Download fact sheet 1 (low res) (1.13MB) 


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